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Notable Finding:  People are only dimly aware of characteracterics that distinguish humans from non-humans, which suggests that as computers continue to become more humanlike, people will more easily be fooled into thinking that computers (chatbots on the Internet, for example) are people.

Test

http://HowHumanAreYou.com

Recent Publications

Epstein, R. (2016, July/August). Are humans doomed? A review of George Zarkadakis’ In Our Own Image. Scientific American Mind, p. 68.

Epstein, R. (2016, May 18). The empty brain. Aeon.

Epstein, R. (2015, November/December). Brain wars: A review of Malcolm Gay's The Brain Electric: The Dramatic High-Tech Race to Merge Minds and Machines. Scientific American Mind, p. 70.

Epstein, R. (2014, June 11). Claims that the Turing test has been passed are nonsense [Letter].  The Guardian.

Epstein, R., Roberts, G., & Beber, G. (Eds.). (2008) Parsing the Turing Test: Methodological
and philosophical issues in the quest for the thinking computer. Dordrecht, The Netherlands: Springer.

Epstein, R.  (2007, October/November).  From Russia, with love: How I got fooled (and somewhat humiliated) by a computerScientific American Mind, pp. 16-17.

Epstein, R. (2006, June/July). My date with a robot. Scientific American Mind, pp. 68-73.

Recent Presentations

Epstein, R., & Kirkish, G. (2012, November). How good are humans at distinguishing humans from computers? Paper presented at the 42nd annual meeting of the Society for Computers in Psychology, Minneapolis, MN.

 

2015, November/December

©2012, AIBRT